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Cytomegalovirus linked to Systemic lupus erythrematosus, Systemic sclerosis, Autoimmune diabetes

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus that infects people of all ages and is a member of the herpesvirus family. Most people with CMV do not have any symptoms, and the virus is usually harmless. However, CMV can cause serious health problems in people with immun systems not prepared to manage the infection. In this article, we will explore the association between CMV and various autoimmune disorders, including myocarditis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes. We will also discuss known cross-reactions with CMV and the risk of transmission to infants.

Myocarditis is a condition where the heart muscle becomes inflamed, leading to reduced blood flow and damage to the heart. CMV has been associated with myocarditis, and studies have shown that people with myocarditis have a higher prevalence of CMV antibodies. This suggests that CMV may play a role in the development of myocarditis. Furthermore, CMV has been shown to replicate in the heart, which can cause damage to the heart muscle.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect any part of the body. It occurs when the immune system attacks healthy tissues and organs, leading to inflammation and tissue damage. Several studies have shown an association between CMV and SLE. Patients with SLE have higher levels of CMV antibodies, suggesting that CMV may trigger the development of SLE or exacerbate the disease.

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease that affects the connective tissue and can cause scarring and thickening of the skin, blood vessels, and internal organs. Studies have shown an association between CMV and SSc. Patients with SSc have higher levels of CMV antibodies, and CMV DNA has been detected in the skin of SSc patients. This suggests that CMV may play a role in the development of SSc.

Autoimmune diabetes, also known as type 1 diabetes, is a chronic autoimmune disease that occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Several studies have shown an association between CMV and autoimmune diabetes. The detection of CMV antibodies indicates an increased risk of developing autoimmune diabetes, and CMV has been shown to infect insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.

In addition to the association between CMV and autoimmune disorders, there are known cross-reactions between CMV and other diseases. The detection of antibodies to CMV indicates that the patient has an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, arthritis, lupus, and neurological disorders. CMV can also cause birth defects in infants born to mothers who have a primary infection or a recurrent infection during pregnancy. The rate of transmission to infants born to infected mothers is 32% and 1.4%, respectively. Babies born to infected mothers can have birth defects causing deafness and mental retardation.

The association between CMV and autoimmune disorders is not fully understood, but it is believed that CMV may trigger the development of autoimmune disorders by inducing an immune response that targets both the virus and the body’s own cells. The immune response may also cause inflammation, tissue damage, and scarring, leading to the development of autoimmune disorders.

In conclusion, CMV is a common virus that can cause serious health problems in people with weakened immune systems. It has been associated with various autoimmune disorders, including myocarditis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes. The detection of antibodies to CMV indicates an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, arthritis, lupus, and neurological disorders. Furthermore, babies born to infected mothers can have birth defects causing deafness and mental retardation.

Meet the Author

Dr. Matz DC

Dr. Jeffrey E. Matz, DC, MS, is a Board Certified Chiropractic Physician. He is licensed to practice in SC, NC, and GA. Dr. Matz is passionate about functional medicine and strives to help patients achieve optimal health. His focus is on helping our members with hormone imbalances, autoimmune conditions, chronic pain conditions, and diabetes. Among the thousands of people Dr. Matz has treated include Carolina Panthers football players, PGA Tour and Champions Tour golfers, collegiate athletes, and local and international celebrities. Dr. Matz was a semiprofessional cyclist, and has competed in triathlons for the last 7 years, including completing an IRONMAN triathlon.

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